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Dr. Prakash Nallathamby wins Pfizer Young Investigator Poster Award

Nancy Davis • DATE: November 5, 2015

Dr. Prakash Nallathamby wins Pfizer Young Investigator Poster Award

Dr. Prakash Nallathamby

Postdoctoral Research Associate Prakash Nallathamby was awarded a Pfizer Young Investigator Poster Award during a recent retreat held by the Cancer Biology Training Consortium Symposium.

Dr. Nallathamby, who works with Professor Ryan Roeder of the Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, is currently working on the modular assembly of surface functionalized core-shell nanoparticles as novel image contrast agents. Dr. Nallathamby is developing a modular approach to design a spectral library of core-shell nanoparticle contrast agents, which will have broad applications in biomedical imaging due to its potential for multi-modal imaging (e.g., fluorescence, MRI, X-ray) and active targeting through molecular surface functionalization. It is anticipated that this modular approach will provide a platform for facile customization of core-shell nanoparticles, for multi-modal imaging probes with tailored surface functionality to target specific cancer subsets.

This research work was presented as a poster at the Cancer Biology Training Consortium (CABTRAC 2015) retreat at Kiawah Island, SC on October 26, 2015. Dr. Nallathamby‘s poster was selected as the top postdoc juried poster and he was awarded the Pfizer Young Investigator Poster Award.

Established in 2005, the Cancer Biology Training Consortium (CABTRAC) facilitates the interdisciplinary exchange of ideas between individuals and institutions that are dedicated training the next generation of cancer researchers. Over 80 institutions US-wide and the National Cancer Institute’s Cancer Training Branch work jointly together in this consortium. Their Cancer Biology Annual Retreat is seen as the premiere Cancer Biology Training conference in the United States to connect today’s and tomorrow’s leaders in cancer research